s life. Now both Sonam and his wife work in Beijing while raising a daughter, who is now a year old.

“We plan to let our child study in Beijing,” he said. “We want her to get in touch

with avant-garde thoughts, broaden her horizons and pursue a life she likes,” he said.

Like Sonam Tsering, Tsering Lhakyi also benefited from the country’s ethnic policies.

In the 1980s, due to a lack of skilled workers and the poor educational foundation in the Tibet autonomous regi

on, the government decided to offer classes to Tibetan children. In 1985, the first batch of them went inland to study. Sin

ce then, an increasing number have pursued studies in more developed areas in China.

Tsering Lhakyi, born in the 1990s, was raised in Tibet’s Nagchu prefecture. Because of her h

igh scores in the primary school, she was admitted to an inland Tibetan middle school. After the national col

lege entrance exam, she applied to a university in Yantai, Shandong province, because she “wanted to see the sea”.

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